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dc.contributor.advisorFernandez, Lovell
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Carol
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-02T14:05:51Z
dc.date.available2017-08-02T14:05:51Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11394/5527
dc.descriptionMagister Legum - LLMen_US
dc.description.abstractFrom failing to arrest and surrender Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir1 in accordance with its obligations under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court2 (Rome Statute), to its President acting inconsistently with its Supreme law3 , it is evident that the rule of law is under threat in South Africa. Furthermore, South Africa has witnessed the cultivation of a culture of impunity for corruption in high office. South Africa has also experienced an increase in heinous crimes committed against women and children. The South African Rand recently plummeted given that its Minister of Finance Pravin Gordhan, recently faced charges of fraud4 , as well as the ripple effect caused by the Fees Must Fall Movement.5 Against the backdrop of the above-mentioned issues that plague South Africa and hinder its development, the fight against money laundering hardly seems of pivotal importance in achieving the desired stability and development of the country.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of the Western Capeen_US
dc.subjectMoney launderingen_US
dc.subjectClient Due Diligenceen_US
dc.subjectFinancial Intelligence Centre Acten_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africa. Financial Intelligence Centre Act, 2001en_US
dc.titleAn analysis of the critical shortcomings in South Africa's anti-money laundering legislationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Western Capeen_US


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