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dc.contributor.advisorMaharaj, S.R.
dc.contributor.authorGounden, Perumal Kistna
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-30T11:10:36Z
dc.date.available2021-08-30T11:10:36Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11394/8406
dc.descriptionPhilosophiae Doctor - PhDen_US
dc.description.abstractIt has become a world trend that the opportunity for university education should be made available to all. The twentieth century witnessed the partial demolition of the barrier that retained higher education as the privilege of the élite group. Attendance at a university is seen today as the gateway to the membership of a profession, and to all the benefits of improved economic and social status. Rapid economic and industrial development in South Africa and overseas in the second half of this century has caused a general shortage of scientific manpower. Malherbe (1977, 496) stresses that full opportunities for developing the talent of every individual are no longer an idealistic aim but an economic necessity. The Wiehahn Commission (1980, 12), appointed by the South African Government to inquire into labour legislation and labour systems in South Africa, reported that a serious shortage of skilled manpower for professional, managerial and technical positions still exists. The universities, now having a major responsibility in the preparation of such personnel, have assumed greater significance as far as the public and private sectors are concerned. Educated people are a part of the nation's best human resources, and because education is one of the chief assets of the individual, there is a compelling need for research to improve the academic performance of students at all levels, especially at university. Arising from the shortage of skilled manpower and the increasingly growing demand for tertiary -education, more students enter universities. The rapid increase in university enrolment has brought with it new interest and concern relating to those students who fail or drop out. The problems of failure and drop-out at university have been the subject of many investigations in Western countries, especially Great Britain (Miller, 1970; Butcher and Rudd, 1972) and the United States of America (Pervin et aZ, -1965; Astin, 1971). In South Africa, the Government appointed a Commission of Inquiry into White universities (Van Wyk de Vries, 1974). Included in its terms of reference were: transition from school to university, and the high failure rate among undergraduates. As Astin (1975, 1) points out, most studies take the view that decision-makers legitimately want to know more about how to increase the students' chances of graduating. This concern is based, inter aZia, on: loss of talent; waste of limited educational resources; vocational and personal setbacks resulting from the student's impeded career development; futile expenditure of money, time and effort. The incidence of failure and drop-out evokes painful responses not only from the student but also from others, including his parents and his university. To parents, the admission to university of their son or daughter often represents a fulfilled ambition and the fruition of years of struggle and hope. Therefore failure or drop-out by the student is also a shattering experience for most parents - many of whom feel that they have failed as parentsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of the Western Capeen_US
dc.subjectSouth African Governmenten_US
dc.subjectProfessionalen_US
dc.subjectManagerialen_US
dc.subjectTertiary -educationen_US
dc.subjectDrop-outen_US
dc.subjectDurban-Westvilleen_US
dc.titleSuccess,failure and drop-out at University a comparative, longitudinal study with special reference to the University of Durban-Westvilleen_US
dc.rights.holderUniversity of the Western Capeen_US


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